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Topic: Disney considers shutting down Orlando studio!, Will all traditional Disney animation go< Next Oldest | Next Newest >

DanMedix Offline

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Posted: Oct. 27, 2003 10:02 am/pm Quote

I've been hearing things from all over.  I wanted to find out once and for all the truth (or at least as close to it as we can get for right now) about the whole "animation" issue.  

Rumors have gone around that Disney is completely abandoning their hand-drawn animation department.  Not just toning it down, or making layoffs, but COMPLETELY ABANDONING IT, SHUTTING IT DOWN, and turning the studios into parking garages!!  The rumors further state that Disney will ONLY (and I mean ONLY) be doing 3d Digital animation (the pixar stuff).  

Is this true?   Are they complete idiots?  What are they smoking?  If it's the case, why haven't we seen a MASSIVE uprising against the company by current/former employees, fans, etc etc??  Why hasn't someone bought many billboards in the area of Mr. Eisner's office that say "You're a jerk, Eisner!"??  


I'm soooo confused.... :hurt:


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Sweetums Offline

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Posted: Oct. 28, 2003 10:46 am/pm Quote

I have heard similar things too in the media.  It makes me mad because they are so quick to proclaim the death of hand drawn animation because of the poor performance of movies like Atlantis and Treasure Planet.  I wish someone would realize that those movies didn't do poorly because they were hand drawn--they were boring.  Sorry, but I just didn't think either one had very good story or characters.  I think if Toy Story or Monsters Inc. would have been hand drawn, they still would have been successful.  

I sure hope they are just rumors and I also hope that Brother Bear will be a good movie that gets 'em on their feet again.


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Goofyteer Offline

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Posted: Oct. 28, 2003 12:31 am/pm Quote

According the Hollywooders like Tim Burton it's typical Hollywood. The minute Hollywood thinks its found a new trend it will go out on it full bore until burnout and dump a ton of glop on everybody in the process :laugh: then they'll move on to something else. Remember how many dumb scifi films we got after the first Star Wars came out?

I've gotten really choosy over going out to movies because I've grown so accustomed to Hollywood giving us lots of dumb films. But I think Brother Bear is going to be a smash, that's because every animated film Disney has ever done with talking animals has gone sky high at the box office without fail and it seems to be the public's favorite thing Disney does  :nod:

At this rate I doubt Hollywood will ever really change. But then the problem isn't just with hand drawn animation, it also appears to be with just about everything else sold in this country too :Oo:


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RichKoster Offline

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Posted: Oct. 29, 2003 6:48 am/pm Quote

Disney decides to draw artists into computer age

Read a Wall Street Journal article about Disney's transition to computer animation.
Full details.


Looks like a bear market for 2-D animation

Movie critic Leonard Maltin discusses the future of 2-D animation at Disney.
Full details.


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DanMedix Offline

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Posted: Oct. 29, 2003 7:10 am/pm Quote

Thanks for the links.  I really like Maltin's take on the subject, and hope that Brother Bear is successful enough to make the Hollywood crowd and Management Idiots sit up and take notice!

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CarolKoster Offline

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Posted: Oct. 30, 2003 12:44 am/pm Quote

I think what's really going on is a complete misunderstanding.  

The first two obvious things you notice about all of what's Pixar's put out since 1995 are 1) They're computer graphic (CGI) movies, and 2) They all made a big pile of money.  You look at "Shrek" by DreamWorks and "Ice Age" by Fox and you can also say 1) and 2).  And except for "Lilo & Stitch" a lot of 2-D movies, including from Disney and other studios including DreamWorks, aren't doing so well by comparison.  Hence is the conclusion that 2-D is flopping with audiences and 3-D and CGI are hits and the trend of the future?

When you look harder than 1) and 2) you see a 3) Excellent story and 4) Excellent characterization and 5) Something the entire family can like that isn't too saccharine throughout and is also hip, witty, has subtle adult humor in it, etc.  Overlay 3), 4) and 5) over some of Disney's recent feature animation efforts (except for "Lilo & Stitch") and you realize that Disney's lost some of its muse and that Pixar found Disney's muse.  Disney's lost artistic and management talent to other studios and businesses.  With the contract work that goes on in Hollywood nowadays no one stays in the same place for long, they simply sign on on a contract project to project basis.  Then you look at Pixar.  Their creative workers seem more stable and aren't moving around so much professionally.  They have an internal stable of talent to draw ideas and work on the creative process with, and they can take the time to do their projects right start to finish because they aren't saddled with the same sort of management bureaucracy that other studios such as Disney have.  John Lasseter at Pixar is this generation's version of Walt Disney:  Creative, has an uncanny sense of the audience of his films, knows instinctively how to reach that audience emotionally as well as utilizing technology to serve that purpose but not allowing technology to get in the way of good stories and good characterizations.  So after looking at any Pixar recent film you eventually lose the "Wow!" of the technology and become engrossed in the story, characters and emotions.  Pixar's movies are cohesive and focused.  Just looking at "Brother Bear"'s teasers and trailers, it smacks of "Look we're trying to make Lion King, Tarzan, Pocahontas, Bambi and our oldies but goodies movies all over again because that's familiar to you!" and not truly coming up with new fresh efforts.  

2-D animation is not dead, it thrives in the marketplace alongside 3-D.  And it's because of the characters and story.  SpongeBob SquarePants is 2-D, makes money for it's parent company Nickelodeon every bit as much as Jimmy Neutron is 3-D and CGI also makes money for Nickelodeon.  Kim Possible is very 2-D and look how Disney is marketing that show from the Disney Channel.

Some of the Hollywood press is fascinated with itself and enjoys hand-wringing and looking somewhat at the superficial and obvious.  Ignore some of these doom-and-gloom articles and take a look at the real broader marketplace at what is "selling", or not.  Characters and shows based on 2-D and 3-D concepts are both rising, and flopping, in the marketplace at the same time.  The difference isn't how many dimensions or hand-drawn or not.  The difference is effective characterization and story telling, or not.


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Scottwdw Offline

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Posted: Oct. 31, 2003 11:03 am/pm Quote

Don't forget about Disney's Emperor's New Groove.  If that had been released as a summer movie, I think it would have done much better in the theater.  I know it's almost a cult favorite within the Disney community.  Not to mention some of the best quotes every in a Disney animated feature (remember PoC is live action :D ).

"Why do we have that lever?"  :laughbig:


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RichKoster Offline

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Posted: Nov. 10, 2003 1:02 am/pm Quote

Disney Does Digital, Ditches Drawings

Quick quote:
This is something which has been the talk amongst animators for the past couple of weeks: Walt Disney Feature Animation is in the process of halting all work on traditionally-animated features and going completely CG. Supposedly, all of their animators -- even staunch traditionalists such as Glenn Keane -- are being trained on 3D computer animation techniques. The last hand-drawn high-budget Disney feature scheduled for release is Home on the Range, which is due out next April. It appears that Disney is bowing to the supposed pressures of the market, even though the hand-drawn Lilo and Stitch was considered a success and the all-CG Dinosaur (done at Disney's now-defunct FX house The Secret Lab) was not.

Full details.


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RichKoster Offline

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Posted: Nov. 10, 2003 1:15 am/pm Quote

Disney's Dwindling Draw

Quick quote:
Since Disney's 1999 release of Tarzan, only Lilo & Stitch has broken the $100 million mark at the domestic box office. On the other hand, Pixar's five titles have averaged $239 million in stateside ticket sales.

This disparity was magnified over the weekend after Disney's Brother Bear went into hibernation in its second week. Yes, everyone figured it would be lapped by Time Warner's Matrix Revolutions. It was. But the Disney release drew little more than half the audience of Elf -- its more direct rival in competing for families over the holidays.

Bad timing, Bear. Last week, Pixar's Finding Nemo set the new one-day record for home video and DVD sales when it moved 8 million copies.

Full details. (Free registration is required to view.)


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CarolKoster Offline

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Posted: Nov. 10, 2003 1:18 am/pm Quote

It ain't the form, Disney.  It's the content.  Put simply:  Pixar, since "Toy Story" in 1995, has done "Disney" movies better than Disney has.  That's why audiences flock to Pixar's animated movies and not so much so to Disney's any more.  The "WOW!" factor of the computer graphics gives way after awhile and audiences love the stories and characters.  If Disney keeps going in the trend direction it has for the past few years, except for "Lilo & Stitch", Disney will discover how quick the "WOW!" factor of the CGI wears off and how audiences will expect a story and memorable characters to identify with.  Will someone brew a pot of coffee and send it to Disney with an alarm clock, so they can literally wake up and smell the coffee on this point?

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