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+--Forum: Walt Disney World tips, trip reports, comments and questions
+---Topic: Mission: SPACE at Epcot started by RichKoster


Posted by: RichKoster on Mar. 11, 2002 10:44 am/pm



Mission: SPACE
  • Preview ride sessions: Open 7 days a week now starting at 1 pm instead of 4 pm. May have down times as adjustments are made. All four centrifuges are now open.
  • Special preview and Annual Passholder event: August 1-3 for those with a WDW Annual Passport
  • Pre-Launch Date: Disney announced at the end of July that starting August 10th Mission: SPACE will give Guests previews of this ride all throughout Epcot's operating hours.
  • Launch Date: The official soft opening is August 15 and is being called Mission: SPACE's "Launch Date" by Disney. This is the first time Disney has announced an official soft opening date for any attraction
  • Official Grand Opening: October 9


For the special preview and Annual Passholder event Aug. 1-3, all you'll need to do is show your AP to get in (the invitation form will not be needed to go on the attraction).

< Disney's official Mission: SPACE website >

The next Walt Disney World Resort attraction will go where no thrill ride has gone before -- deep space. Epcot's newest attraction, Mission: SPACE, to be presented by Compaq Computer Corporation, will lift off 2003.

Offering guests a one-of-a-kind "astronaut-like" experience, Mission: SPACE will launch guests into a simulated space adventure -- from pulse-racing lift-off to weightlessness in outer space.

In association with former NASA advisors, astronauts and scientists, Walt Disney Imagineering created Mission: SPACE with new technologies, making it the first ride system ever created to take guests straight up in simulated flight. Set decades into the future, guests are transported in time and place to an International Space Training Center where they will encounter simulated challenges faced by real astronauts.

Plans for Mission: SPACE were aboard NASA's International Space Station shuttle flight, with the launch of Atlantis in 2000.

"The combination of Disney magic and Compaq technology will create a truly one-of-a-kind guest experience," said Al Weiss, president of Walt Disney World Resort. "Epcot is the perfect setting, continuing the park's dedication to the explorer in all of us with its unique attractions that inspire us to discover new worlds."

"Computers are vital in developing space programs today and well into the future," said Michael Capellas, CEO of Compaq Computer Corporation. "With some of the most advanced technology ever produced, Mission: SPACE will provide guests with a rare glimpse into a world where the possibilities for computers and space flight are endless."

With a career in the NASA space program that spanned more than 30 years, six-time NASA shuttle astronaut Story Musgrave is an ongoing consultant to Disney's Mission: SPACE project. Musgrave calls the new attraction, "a place where guests can imagine our future in space and their role in it, walking in the footsteps of heroes and building on the wealth of technology we've developed to date."

Mission: SPACE will be in a new Epcot Future World facility next to the Test Track attraction.

Compaq is a major provider of servers, PCs and services to The Walt Disney Company and its Internet initiatives. Mission: SPACE represents a broadening of the relationship between Compaq and The Walt Disney Company.


Posted by: jenpiehl on Mar. 20, 2002 12:08 am/pm

This is SO wonderful! I have been waiting for a new ride that delt with this topic. This should be fun.:shocked:
Posted by: Mickey on April 30, 2002 2:55 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEARS!
It's gonna be a blast! Blast off, that is! Huh-ha!

Is Epcot's Mission: Space construction on schedule?
Find out if Epcot's next blockbuster attraction, Mission: Space, is on schedule for its 2003 opening.
< Full Story >


Posted by: Rufus on May 27, 2002 12:11 am/pm

Is Epcot's Mission: Space construction on schedule?

Pretty much. The countdown sign was removed because guests had calculated the opening date and were booking hotel rooms, asking for guarantees the attraction would be open on schedule!

After Test Track, Disney isn't making <strong>any</strong> promises about when or if a new attraction will open.

False alarm, fortunately.


Posted by: blue fairy on Jan. 25, 2003 1:46 am/pm

Is there a date for the official opening? We are going to WDW the end of February. No chance, huh?:(
Posted by: disneygeek on Jan. 25, 2003 5:54 am/pm

Yep, originally they said Spring 2003, but I have read on a couple sites its looking like Summer if not fall.  Seems just like Test Track... hopefully it won't be delayed as much as TT was.


In the Walt Disney World pictorial update section of my site I have some shots of the exterior, showing the entrance, exit, and extended queue, as well as the front of the building.


Later,

Posted by: RichKoster on Feb. 18, 2003 9:50 am/pm

WDWMagic.com has two Mission: Space things for you to check out.

First, take a look at < interior photos of the Mission: Space capsules (ride vehicles) >.

Then read < Local6.com's update > which talks about WDWMagic.com's photos.

Posted by: RichKoster on April 25, 2003 5:00 am/pm

Mission: SPACE at Epcot Set to Send Guests Out of This World

Launch Date Preview is Aug. 15, 2003

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The excitement, the thrill and the rush of rocketing into outer space is coming soon to Walt Disney World Resort.

Mission: SPACE -- the next awesome adventure at Epcot -- is a one-of-a-kind thrill that will rocket guests to the galaxies in an out-of-this-world space adventure. Mission: SPACE officially launches in October. Presented by HP and featuring breakthrough technology that creates an unforgettable launch sequence and interplanetary journey, Mission: SPACE will take amazed riders straight up into space and on to Mars.

Guests who accept the mission will engage in a one-of-a-kind astronaut experience that launches them into a simulated space adventure -- from pulse-racing liftoff to the sensations of traveling though outer space on a mission to Mars.

“The combination of creative and entertainment magic of Disney and the technology of HP will create an experience that our guests can get nowhere else in the world,” said Al Weiss, president of Walt Disney World Resort. “Epcot is the perfect setting, continuing the park’s dedication to the explorer in all of us.”

The new attraction is the most technologically advanced ever created by Disney. In association with former NASA advisors, astronauts and scientists, Walt Disney Imagineering developed Mission: SPACE as the first ride system ever created to take guests straight up in simulated flight.




Pre-Show
The setting for the attraction is several decades into the future at the International Space Training Center. As the “crew” selected for this ultimate space mission, guests head to the dispatch area and then move to the Ready Room where they receive a history of astronaut training and are given the role they will assume during the mission -- as the commander, pilot, navigator or engineer.






Countdown…Liftoff
Then it’s on to the pre-flight corridor to load into the spacecraft, receive final briefings from CapCom and buckle in for liftoff. When the countdown reaches zero, the most unique and exhilarating ride experience ever begins. The earth begins to rumble, white clouds of exhaust start to stir as the ascent toward the sky starts and guests are rocketed into the galaxies. Guests hear from CapCom and are asked to perform vital tasks that will land their spacecraft safely on Mars. Each guest will assume the role of Commander, Pilot, Navigator or Engineer. But there is no mission without surprise as guests encounter unexpected twists, turns and other challenges that test every astronaut. Quick thinking and fast reactions are needed by each guest to successfully complete the mission.

“It’s an amazing experience. It’s out of this world,” said Bob Zalk, Walt Disney Imagineer and co-producer of Mission: SPACE. “Guests will certainly say this ride is unlike any other experience they have had before.”

The realism of the experience adds to its uniqueness, said Susan Bryan, Walt Disney Imagineer and co-producer of Mission: SPACE.

“Mission: SPACE is very much based in reality. It’s a mix of real science and thrill,” Bryan said. The sensations are what the astronauts actually experience, but it’s accessible to everyone.




Post Show
Training is not complete when the capsule lands. Guests can proceed to the Mission: SPACE Post Show, powered by HP. In this Advanced Training Lab, guests of all ages have an opportunity to explore interactive space experiences, which include:
  • Space Race -- Two teams compete against each other in a race to send their rocket from Mars back to Earth. Nearly 60 people can play the high-energy game at one time.



  • Space Base -- For junior astronauts, Space Base provides a fun, interactive crawl space for exploration.



  • Expedition: Mars -- A joystick and a jet pack button help guests explore the surface of Mars.
  • Postcards from Space -- Guests can e-mail a video of themselves with one of the space-themed backgrounds and create a great souvenir of their Mission: SPACE experience.





Epcot is the Walt Disney World Resort discovery park, where guests are immersed in a celebration of both technological accomplishments and international cultural achievements. The 300-acre theme park features two unique worlds -- Future World and World Showcase -- with attractions, shows, interactive presentations, dining, shopping and architectural wonders. Epcot is part of the 30,500-acre Walt Disney World Resort, near Orlando, Fla.

For more information, call 407/824-4321 or visit < www.disneyworld.com >.

Copyright 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on June 28, 2003 12:00 am/pm



Mission: Space
  • Preview ride sessions: Open 7 days a week now starting at 1 pm instead of 4 pm. May have down times as adjustments are made. All four centrifuges are now open.
  • Special preview and Annual Passholder event: August 1-3 for those with a WDW Annual Passport
  • Pre-Launch Date: Disney announced at the end of July that starting August 10th Mission: Space will give Guests previews of this ride all throughout Epcot's operating hours.
  • Launch Date: The official soft opening is August 15 and is being called Mission: Space's "Launch Date" by Disney. This is the first time Disney has announced an official soft opening date for any attraction
  • Official Grand Opening: October 9


People who have received an invitation in the mail for the Special preview and Annual Passholder event Aug. 1-3 report that information printed on it says that the form will not be needed to go on the attraction. All you'll need to do is show your AP and you get in.

< Disney's official Mission: Space website >

Posted by: WebTink on June 28, 2003 5:36 am/pm

I am SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO hoping this means that later in that same week it will be open to the rest of us!  We're not AP holders, well, because we live in Oregon and would never go annually.  But anyway, we are going that same week  Can you imagine?!  Getting to go on its inaugural runs that week?  Too cool!  I'm talking MEGA MEMORY MAKING! :Oo:
Posted by: RichKoster on June 28, 2003 5:51 am/pm

Well, the officially-announced soft opening date is August 15th... But when Guests have been chosen to test it out has lately been weekdays between 4 pm and 9 pm, so if you're there in front of the attraction at that time, maybe you'll get lucky.

But remember, WebTink and everyone, any information you read about Mission Space here on the Disney Echo or other websites has not been officially released and so should be taken in that light. Do NOT plan a vacation around this rumor! Again, the official soft opening date Disney has announced is August 15, 2003.

Posted by: WebTink on June 28, 2003 6:13 am/pm

Okay, okay, okay, don't be a killjoy!  LOL!  We will take it as a big bonus if it is open and if it's not, we'll just weep in silence!  Don't worry--not planning my vacation around it!  But, if we "just happen" to be in Future World between 4 and 9 p.m.........

:laugh:

Posted by: RichKoster on June 28, 2003 6:17 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
But, if we "just happen" to be in Future World between 4 and 9 p.m.........

:laugh:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


.........and if you get picked.........then be sure to run to Innoventions right after you ride and send me email from Epcot with a quick trip report about it!
:wwww:

Posted by: WebTink on June 28, 2003 8:37 am/pm

Oh yeah, THAT will be my priority!

:tounge:

Posted by: RichKoster on June 28, 2003 8:43 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
Oh yeah, THAT will be my priority!

:tounge:

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That's gratitude for ya... you hear about "MEGA MEMORY MAKING" stuff here on the Disney Echo, then when you get to WDW we're yesterday's bathwater...
:cry:

Posted by: WebTink on June 28, 2003 8:53 am/pm

Hmmmm...this from the guy we didn't hear hide nor hair from during HIS recent trip to WDW! (And don't use the fact that you at "Fort Wilderness" as an excuse either...we know it's not THAT far removed from civilization! ) And, you know, I still haven't heard a thorough trip report from him either. What's up with that?   :suspect:  (Okay, maybe I've just missed your trip post, but still....I at least need a "line" report--what were the crowds like?)

I will be reporting in to y'all after my trip, that's for sure. I am planning to keep a journal--in fact, I've already started it and have included, within its pages, my general gratitude for this group.  I feel really blessed to have found this forum with all the great tips and advice you seasoned travelers share.  Really feel like it's going to make a HUGE difference in our experience.

Posted by: RichKoster on June 28, 2003 9:19 am/pm

Why do you think they call it Fort Wilderness??? Hey, it's really roughing it when you have to bring along your home VCR because Disney only provides a videocassette player, and then you have to reroute cables to get everything working... and you discover that you didn't bring the VCR's remote control from home (trying not to pack too much! ) and that VCR wasn't programmed at home to receive the same TV channels that Disney uses, and you need that remote in order to reprogram the VCR's channels, so you won't be able to record all the in-resort Disney channels that you wanted to... Yeah, I was quite busy!
:)

Anyway, you asked about the crowds at WDW while we were there. Well, they were thick. The place was packed with 'em and they were crawlin' all over everywhere. In fact, we had to call Mousekeeping three times to get them to spray to keep 'em away from our inside cabin, and we also called the first day we arrived to have them remove a mound of them from near our driveway.

Oh, you weren't talking about insects? I was. ;)
I've posted about the insect bites at Fort Wilderness I got in this message if you want to see my first trip report about our stay.
:)

Now, the crowds of people were non-existant. Test Track ran out of Fastpasses, of course, but we got ours in the morning and rode it with only a 30 minute wait. (30 minute wait with a Fastpass???) Everything else was very easy to ride - - sometimes 10 to 20 minute waits in the Magic Kingdom. Some rides throughout WDW were a walk-on.

Some schools in the northern U.S. had not let out for the summer yet, plus I have a feeling some people put off their summer WDW vacations until after July 3rd this year in order to take advantage of the Fairytale packages. So that might be why the crowds were light to moderate for us.

We kept notes in our PassPorter as well as taping a whole bunch of stuff I'll review to take more notes from (and grab stills to upload here as well). So more details are coming.

Plus, I really need to finish up the report on the last two days of our April trip which I haven't finished yet!
:o

And thanks for the kind words about this website and the fine group of people we have here. I appreciate it.

Now will you send me a quick email from Epcot if you get to ride on Mission Space? I hear you can even send a video card right from the post-show at Mission Space, so it'll be real easy!
:nod:

Posted by: WebTink on June 28, 2003 10:34 am/pm

Okay, I promise! :talktohand: (Looks like this MickEmoticon is taking an oath, but I see that it's called "talk to the hand! hahaha!;)

I guess this is a really easy promise to make, huh, because it is SO doubtful we'll even come anywhere near Mission: Space, huh?!  But, hey, I really do promise.  In fact, I'll write down the email address in my journal TONIGHT!

Posted by: RichKoster on July 03, 2003 6:23 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Looks like Disney EchoEar Steve / Surge is the first one of us to ride Mission Space as well as send us a video postcard from Space!

Steve writes:
Greetings from the ISTC Communications Center at Mission: SPACE, a thrilling new adventure opening at Walt Disney World's Epcot in 2003. We would like to confirm that STEVE has transmitted a video Postcard from Space created especially for you.

< To view your Postcard from Space, simply click here. >

Check out your video postcard as often as you like over the next 90 days!

If you would like to learn more about Mission: SPACE - or send your own Postcard from Space to friends and family - go to:
< http://www.disney.go.com/vacations/missionspace >.

Roger, out!

Mission: SPACE Communications Center

Posted by: RichKoster on July 04, 2003 12:55 am/pm

Yoo Hoo Disney EchoEars!

This is the Communications Center at Mission: SPACE, the new thrill adventure opening at Walt Disney World's Epcot in 2003. We would like to confirm that Disney EchoEar RichKoster has transmitted a Postcard from Space assembled especially for you.

To observe your Postcard from Space, simply < click here > (or copy this ENTIRE link and paste it into your Web browser):


---------------------CODE SAMPLE-------------------
http://www.disney.go.com/vacations/missionspace/getpostcard.html?1940C24EB8AC7973950E5CD95851F564
---------------------CODE SAMPLE-------------------



Examine your postcard as often as you like over the next 90 days! Roger, out.

Mission: SPACE Communications Center

P.S. If you would like to learn more about Mission: SPACE - or send your own Postcards from Space to friends and family - go to < http://www.disney.com/missionspace >

Posted by: RichKoster on July 26, 2003 1:13 am/pm

According to < screamscape.com >, over the past week Disney started opening the window of opportunity to ride Mission: Space a bit more.

The preview ride sessions have been expanded to include weekend days now and in the past few days, they have started to open the ride at 1 pm instead of 4 pm.

They’ve also heard a few stories about a third centerfuge being added to the mix as well, so the line can move even faster than before.

Posted by: TINY on July 26, 2003 6:09 am/pm

hey, has anyone done mission space?  i heard from a friend that everyone was getting so motion sick on the ride that disney has had to tone it down several times.  i even heard that some people were getting hit with other people's puke!  NO THANKS.  i think we'll skip it during our august trip if that's the case.
Posted by: RichKoster on July 26, 2003 7:05 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, TINY!

Think about it... If everyone was getting "urpy" during the ride, then why would only some people being hit with other people's "protein"?

No, only some of the people are reporting that they've gotten sick (far from everyone, by the way) and what has been found is that most of those who got sick didn't follow the directions to keep your head against the head rest and not to look towards the side.

Just goes to show ya, tell your friend not to believe everything they read on some other boards.
:smart:

Posted by: TINY on July 27, 2003 12:42 am/pm

hey rich,  i actualy heard about people getting let's say nauseous from a family that had just returned from wdw.  i'm sure that everyone has a different tolerance and opinion.  i thought it would be helpful to get a few other first-hand opinions.
Posted by: RichKoster on July 27, 2003 6:20 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
hey rich,  i actualy heard about people getting let's say nauseous from a family that had just returned from wdw.  i'm sure that everyone has a different tolerance and opinion.  i thought it would be helpful to get a few other first-hand opinions.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Oh, I'm not disagreeing that people are getting sick to varying degrees on the new attraction -- just that I think it is easy to get the impression that the vast majority of people are getting sick on Mission: Space. And I'm not convinced that is the case (in fact, I think it is the opposite).

No offense intended and I agree with you that the first-hand reports are very helpful.

Posted by: Goofyteer on July 29, 2003 7:44 am/pm

Oh man! I'm soooo psyched up now! I'm DYIN' to ride this one! Absolutely DYIN'! Will I MAKE IT til my next trip to WDW?!

Never mind the possibility of my getting sick on the ride... will I get sick WAITING for the ride? LOL

Thanks for all your info and everything Rich! Oh and check this out... I just looked at the link you provided for the ride's official website, and it has a vote question for "On your trip to the moon, which would you like as your in-flight movie?" Would you believe that one of the available choices is "Amazon Women On The Moon"? I'm not kidding about this! LOL


By the way, what the heck does the phrase "talk to the hand" mean, anyway? I've only heard it a couple of times before this thread.

Posted by: RichKoster on July 30, 2003 12:02 am/pm

"Talk to the hand" I believe comes from a fairly recent movie which I haven't seen. It basically means "I'm not listening to you, so talk to my hand (which of course doesn't have any ears, so you're wasting your time continuing to talk)."

:talktohand:

But even though the above MickEmoticon is named "talktohand" I think it also looks like someone who good-naturedly is saying "Stop, please, you're too kind."

So, use it with either meaning you like. :)

Posted by: RichKoster on July 30, 2003 12:05 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Getting back to Mission: Space in this thread, I just heard great news!

Disney has just announced that starting August 10th Mission: Space will be open during Epcot's operating hours giving Guests previews of this ride which still officially opens in October and still has its announced "Soft Opening" on August 15th.

I think that's A-OK!
:wwww:

Posted by: Goofyteer on July 30, 2003 2:37 am/pm

I wonder if WDW/Epcot have created any special toys and stuff to mark the Mission: Space occasion? I would assume they would. :nod:
Posted by: RichKoster on July 30, 2003 11:18 am/pm

Buzz Aldrin travels to Mars aboard Mission: Space at Epcot

Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin who walked on the moon during Apollo 11 with Neil Armstrong is the inspiration for the "Buzz" in Buzz Lightyear




Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin took the controls aboard Mission: SPACE on July 28, 2003, at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., during the filming of an ABC television segment that features the new Epcot thrill attraction.

Aldrin was joined by actors (L-R): Dhalyn Adams and Tyler Kremer. Aldrin was the lunar module pilot aboard the Apollo 11 mission that landed on the moon July 20, 1969. Mission: SPACE, which opens Aug. 15, 2003, will take Epcot guests on a pulse-racing ride to Mars.

Aldrin's television segment will be shown Aug. 15, 2003, on ABC-TV during the network's airing of the feature film "Mission to Mars."

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on July 30, 2003 11:29 am/pm

Buzz Aldrin travels to Mars aboard Mission: Space at Epcot

Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin who walked on the moon during Apollo 11 with Neil Armstrong is the inspiration for the "Buzz" in Buzz Lightyear

Buzz Aldrin's television segment will be shown Aug. 15, 2003, on ABC-TV during the network's airing of the feature film "Mission to Mars."




Legendary astronaut Buzz Aldrin took the controls aboard Mission: SPACE on July 28, 2003, at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., during the filming of an ABC television segment that features the new Epcot thrill attraction.

Aldrin was joined by actors (L-R): Dhalyn Adams and Tyler Kremer. Aldrin was the lunar module pilot aboard the Apollo 11 mission that landed on the moon July 20, 1969. Mission: SPACE, which opens Aug. 15, 2003, will take Epcot guests on a pulse-racing ride to Mars.

To repeat: Aldrin's television segment will be shown Aug. 15, 2003, on ABC-TV during the network's airing of the feature film "Mission to Mars."

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 02, 2003 11:34 am/pm

Mission: SPACE "secret portal":
What job are you best suited for on Mission: SPACE?


I got this in email today and I want to share it with you... but first, the cool patch on the right was made by using the site!

There's lots of cool things to do there besides making cool patches like this one, which you can print to paper or iron-on transfers. You could make great t-shirts for Disney Echo Mouseke-Meets! I took the astronaut personality test and I'm best suited to be a pilot.
:smart:

You can also download desktop backgrounds, screensavers, sounds and posters.


Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 02, 2003 12:10 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Disney EchoEar disneylandkids pointed out to me in Mouseke-Mail an interesting thing. At < WDW's listing of Epcot park hours > note that all of Epcot is closing at 3 pm on the day Mission: SPACE officially opens! Yup!!

Future World's hours that day are from 9 am until 3 pm, and World Showcase's hours are the same -- 9 am until 3 pm -- and not being open like it usually is from 11 am until 9 pm when IllumiNations! starts. In fact, that is the only day in October when IllumiNations! is not scheduled.

Hmmmm. I bet there's going to be a special media and invited guests-only party that afternoon and evening. And I'd be willing to be that IllumiNations! will take place that night, but everyday WDW Guests will have to be content to see the fireworks from outside Epcot that night.
:stare:

Posted by: Goofyteer on Aug. 02, 2003 1:39 am/pm

Rich: about the site and all it can do, WHOA, I'm off to check this out! Thanks for the info!

Off I go to the new website... see ya in a few weeks! LOL Just kidding. :mickey:

Posted by: utilidor27 on Aug. 02, 2003 5:12 am/pm

Rich,
If you go over to the Treasure Planet.com
website and look over the details of the sweepstakes (the fine print that you need a magnifying glass to read) they mention something about a special event to take place within a certain window of time that the winner of the contest has to attend - a publicity add I guessing. I am willing to bet that that is also going to be the same day as the 3:00 closing!
I wonder what the odds would be of them offering a discount admission to EPCOT the day of the early closing -
:laughbig:

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 07, 2003 12:31 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

So, have you entered the < "secret portal" for Mission: SPACE > yet and taken the ability test?

Reply here with the results of what job in Mission: SPACE are you best suited for. To repeat, I am a pilot!
:smart:

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 07, 2003 9:23 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Andre / SlinkyDog got to ride Mission: SPACE on his recent WDW trip!

Even better, he's written a trip report about it!

Check it out!
:nod:

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 08, 2003 12:16 am/pm

You've got a Postcard From Space!
From: WEBTINK
Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2003 07:02:33 -0700 (PDT)


Dear DISNEYECHO,

Greetings from the ISTC Communications Center at Mission: SPACE, a thrilling new adventure opening at Walt Disney World's Epcot in 2003. We would like to confirm that WEBTINK has transmitted a video Postcard from Space created especially for you.

To view your Postcard from Space, simply click here (or copy this ENTIRE link and paste it into your Web browser):

< http://ms.go.com/retriev....b] >

Check out your video postcard as often as you like over the next 90 days!

If you would like to learn more about Mission: SPACE - or send your own Postcard from Space to friends and family - go to:

< [b]http://www.disney.go.com/vacations/missionspace
>

Roger, out!

Mission: SPACE Communications Center


P.S.  If there is a line break in the above URL, you may need to copy and paste the link into your Web browser's address field one line at a time.

Mission: SPACE Postcards From Space requires the latest version of the QuickTime plug-in.  

If you do not have QuickTime, simply click here (or copy this ENTIRE link and paste it into your Web browser) to download it:

< http://disney.go.com/help/software_center/index.html#quicktime >

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 08, 2003 12:18 am/pm

Does anyone hear what she's saying -- or is it just music like what I'm hearing?

Or does anyone read lips?
:wwww:

Posted by: CarolKoster on Aug. 11, 2003 11:32 am/pm

QUERY:  I've read on other Disney fan WWW site discussion forums comments by others who have ridden Mission: Space.  There's a spectrum of reactions:  "Cool!", variations of illness afterwards upon disembarking (mild to severe nausea, dizziness and loss of balance for up to 30-minutes afterward, sometimes longer) and "All it does is spin around...so what?"  Part of the instruction to guests in the queue is, when riding, look straight ahead or keep eyes shut and don't turn your head at all.  Some posts say they followed instructions and were ill or woozy anyway, others said they followed instructions and did just fine.  Some feel there ought to be less intensity, others feel there ought to be more to it than only spinning around.  I'd be interested in hearing assessments and opinions from anyone riding on or following soft open day on August 15.   Yes, I did read SlinkyDog's trip report about it, in an earlier part of this thread.   I'm looking for additional comments and opinions to notice trends and consensus and among what age groups or demographics.

Regarding getting ill:  There's an episode of the "Arthur" cartoon show on PBS Kids where Arthur and his friends can't wait to visit their local amusement park's new attraction, the Hurl-a-Whirl.  You spin and rotate in all directions for awhile.
Part of the hype-allure is that when boarding all guests receive puke bags.  Upon disembarking, the puke bags are all in active use by guests.  Undaunted and having fun, Arthur and friend get back in line and do it all over again, every detail, and declare this the greatest ride ever.   When reading these posts about Mission: Space elsewhere this show came to mind.  ;-) :barf:  ;-) ;-) ;-)

For those who may prefer a "No Spin Zone" any information and guidance about this query is appreciated, thanks in advance.

A side comment:  If people are getting so ill they are seeking out the nearest trash recepticle, the poor CMs assigned to that area to clean up messes....bless 'em for what they have to do.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 11, 2003 1:10 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
For those who may prefer a "No Spin Zone" any information and guidance about this query is appreciated, thanks in advance.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


And now that Mission: SPACE is open 7 days a week now starting at 1 pm and all four centrifuges are open, that gives more chances for Disney EchoEars who are there now to ride the new attraction.

I agree: Post your comments after riding Mission: SPACE!
:nod:

Posted by: WebTink on Aug. 12, 2003 12:59 am/pm

I will address the whole Mission: Space thing in my trip report, but have to add to this thread, too.  My opinion is that is was a lot tamer than the hype led me to think it would be.  It was fun, and neat to feel the G's, but I didn't think it lasted very long, and didn't find it all that intense.  All the controls are very realistic and add to the excitement.  The pre-ride "training" is great fun and gets the adrenaline pumping as you anticipate the adventure.  I think that they play it up so well that some people's minds must take over!  We had one gal get out of line because she was not feeling well...and we hadn't even done anything yet.

The assigned tasks are easy to complete--just push a button at Gary Sinese's command.  You do have some force pushing against you as you reach out to push the button, but it's not intolerable. (I was the Navigator, by the way, and DH was the Pilot; we had two giddy Japanese girls with us to complete our crew. Our team was laughing the whole time! )

I loved the launch the best!  As you're looking straight ahead, it looks like you're looking into a clear blue sky as the spaceship goes up, up, up against the force of gravity.  Here is where I felt the most pressure.  Then you're clear of the atmosphere, and you feel a bit of that weightlessness people have described.  Nothing like catching air on a roller coaster, though.  

We had to whip around the moon, of course, to get into our flight path to Mars.  That was a lot like a coaster.

The landing was the next bumpy part.  This reminded me very much of the Star Trek Experience and Race to Atlantis in Las Vegas.  Both of those attractions use the 3D movie and motion simulator to create those wild sensations of movement through space, too.  When I first did those rides, I thought I might be affected with motion sickness because I have been known to have a bit of car sickness in the past, but they didn't phase me, and neither did Mission: Space.  I was proud to purchase my Pioneer Crew 2003 t-shirt, without vomiting!   :clapping:

Sorry about the lack of audio on the video card.  It truly is just a video card.  I was telling all of you at the Disney Echo that I'd survived Mission: Space, that it was very cool, and not as bad as everyone had been saying, and that I can't wait for you all to try it.

I'm wondering if maybe they have toned it down some since they began previewing it.  But, maybe not, maybe it's just a personal thing.  My daughter, apparently, got a little queasy, and she said she did not like the launch at all.  

I wonder if how much you weigh makes a difference?  I'm a pretty hefty gal, so maybe that kept me in my seat a little more than a lighter person might experience.  Don't know.  I'm not a physicist and I don't play one on TV either!

I had a blast!  That's all I can say, and I hope to ride it again in October.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 1:33 am/pm

Racing Through Space



Guests become members of Mission Control and use quick thinking when they engage in Space Race, a high-energy interactive game that explores the teamwork needed between mission control and astronauts in space missions. Two teams work against one another to fix problems on their ship and be the first to arrive at the race destination. The Mission: SPACE post show, powered by HP, extends the adventure of Mission: SPACE, a Walt Disney World attraction set for liftoff at Epcot Aug. 15, 2003.

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 1:37 am/pm

Ready for the Mission



Guests respond to instructions from CapCom in order to complete their Mission to Mars during a "test flight" of Mission: SPACE, set to lift off Aug. 15 at Epcot. Inside the capsule, four guests become a team of astronauts working together to fulfill the mission. During this awesome adventure, which gives guests the sensation of blasting off into space, everyone in the capsule participates in completing the mission by using joy sticks and buttons - all while viewing outer space through their own video screen. Mission: SPACE is presented by HP at Walt Disney World Resort.

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 1:41 am/pm

SpaceAdventure



Space Base, one of four activities in the Mission: SPACE post show, gives budding astronauts an opportunity to climb, jump and explore in a space-themed play area. The Mission: SPACE post show, powered by HP, extends the excitement of Mission: SPACE, set to launch at Epcot at Walt Disney World Resort Aug. 15. Guests who accept the mission in this unique attraction will experience the scintillating sensation of launching into space.

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 1:44 am/pm

Navigating on Mars



With the help of a joystick and a jump button, guests help astronauts navigate their way on the surface of Mars, avoiding wind storms and other hurdles in a race against time when they play Expedition Mars. This simulated Mars adventure extends the fun of Mission: SPACE, the Walt Disney World attraction set for liftoff at Epcot on Aug. 15, 2003. Expedition: Mars is one of four interactive experiences found in the Mission: SPACE post show, powered by HP.

Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 1:48 am/pm

Eye-filling Views

Snug in their X-2 space trainer, Walt Disney World guests on the new Mission: SPACE attraction rocket off to Mars in a one-of-a-kind experience. For each Epcot voyager, the wonders of space pour through their viewports. From pulse-racing liftoff,...



...Florida falls away from view...



...as the blackness of space envelops the crew. After dodging a meteor shower and other in-flight surprises, astronauts push deeper to their first jaw-dropping views of Mars...



...A landing attempt on the forbidding Martian landscape awaits (pictured below). To add to the realism of the experience, Walt Disney Imagineers used computer-generated photo-realistic imagery straight from NASA spacecraft. Walt Disney World Resort is in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.



Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 2:01 am/pm

Going Where No Theme Park Attraction Has Gone

Mission: SPACE at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., will take guests on a pulse-racing journey among the stars to Mars. Scheduled for a preview opening in mid-August, Mission: SPACE, presented by HP, is a new E-ticket attraction in the Future World section of Epcot, located in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.









Copyright 2003. THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 13, 2003 3:12 am/pm

Choose to Go! A Step-by-Step Journey Through Mission: SPACE

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The Mission: SPACE adventure for Epcot guests begins well before the countdown to liftoff. Here's a step-by-step journey through the attraction from the entrance courtyard . . . to the exit through Space Cargo Bay.

Entrance
When guests step into the courtyard of Mission: SPACE, they step into the future. The year is 2036. The courtyard -- Planetary Plaza -- features bold spheres symbolizing Earth, Jupiter and the moon. On the wall of the plaza are plaques bearing quotes from notable figures who exemplify the questing spirit that has led mankind into space. Moving words from President John F. Kennedy, Columbia Shuttle astronaut Kalpana Chawla and others are featured. The attraction's 45,000-square-foot building -- the International Space Training Center (ISTC) -- features a curvilinear exterior that surrounds Planetary Plaza.

ISTC Astronaut Recruiting Center
At the entrance to the recruiting center emblazoned in the circular walls is the motto "We choose to go!" It is here that astronaut hopefuls learn about training. This is also where guests see the remarkable model of the ISTC's X2 Trainer, the futuristic spacecraft they will board to embark on a one-of-a-kind journey into space.

Space Simulation Lab
A slowly turning 35-foot-tall gravity wheel containing exercise rooms, offices, work areas and sleeping cubicles for space teams dominates the area. Overhead hangs a model of the ISTC's X-1 spacecraft (a precursor to the X-2) and a graphic of the X-2 with details explaining the shuttle functionality. Also overhead is an authentic Apollo-era Lunar Rover display unit on loan from the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum -- a symbol of mankind's first exploration of another planetary body.

As guests leave the Space Simulation Lab, they encounter plaques marking great moments in space flight -- from 1961 when Yuri Gargarin became the first man in space . . . to the first family in space in the year 2030 and the first deep-space mission aboard the X-2 in 2035.

Training Operations Room
The Training Operations Room is the hub of activity for training sessions in progress. Behind the glass are several large monitors showing live video feeds of ongoing ISTC training sessions.

Team Dispatch
A dispatch officer meets guests in Team Dispatch. This area is dominated by an ISTC logo embedded in the floor. The dispatch officer motions astronaut hopefuls forward. They are assigned to teams of four people and sent to the Ready Room.

Ready Room
It's time for each team member to accept an assignment -- commander, pilot, navigator or engineer. Each role is responsible for a specific task during the mission, enabling the team to affect what happens during the adventure. Here, guests meet Capcom. Capcom, or capsule communicator, is the voice of Mission Control who guides astronauts through their missions.

Pre-Flight Corridor
The pre-flight corridor is inspired by the "White Room" at Kennedy Space Center, where astronauts wait for the countdown to begin. At Mission: SPACE guests receive, via video, final instructions and information from Capcom, who also explains the technology of the X-2 rocket, shows the route of the mission and the destination: Mars. Then, a uniformed flight crewmember escorts the teams to an X-2 trainer. All systems are go!

X-2 Trainer
Each team member is securely strapped into an X-2 trainer. Mission Control monitors the launch sequence. The capsule moves into launch position, pointed straight up toward the sky, and the countdown begins. Then it's 3... 2... 1... liftoff!

The senses are immediately engaged. On takeoff guests experience sensations similar to what astronauts feel during liftoff. They hear the roar of the engines. They view computer-generated photo-realistic imagery based on actual data taken from Mars-orbiting satellites.

During the mission, the team encounters challenges like those of an astronaut as they try to successfully complete the mission. Team members must perform the task associated with the roles they have accepted. It's vital to the outcome of the mission.

Advanced Training Lab
Now that the flight training session is over, guests can find out if they also have what it takes to be part of Mission Control. This is determined in the Advanced Training Lab, a colorful, interactive play area where guests can further test their skills.
  • Mission: SPACE Race -- Up to 60 guests at a time can enroll in this training adventure where two teams, each made up of both astronauts and ground control personnel, race against time to be the first to complete a successful mission. Teams must work together to overcome challenges and setbacks in order to send their rocket from Mars back to Earth.
  • Expedition: Mars -- This simulated astronaut obstacle course, which offers a joystick and a jet-pack button, preps explorers for conditions on other planets.
  • Space Base -- Made for junior astronauts, Space Base is an interactive play area made for climbing, exploring and having fun.
  • Postcards from Space -- At this kiosk guests make a video of themselves with an entertaining space backdrop and e-mail it to friends and family.

Mission: SPACE Cargo Bay
A four-foot-high, 3-D portrayal of Mickey Mouse outfitted in an astronaut space suit with one foot planted on Mars beckons guests into the 1,500-square-foot retail space. Astronaut-inspired gear and supplies are displayed beneath a 12-foot mural featuring Astronauts Mickey, Minnie, Pluto, Goofy and Donald on the surface of Mars with the X-2 shuttle streaking across the stars.

Copyright 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 14, 2003 11:13 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Here's the latest picture and news from Disney about Mission: SPACE:






Walt Disney World Launches Mission: SPACE

Mission: SPACE presented by HP at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., engages Epcot guests in a thrilling training mission that takes them into deep space.

Copyright 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 15, 2003 10:08 am/pm

Exhibit takes riders out of this world

Read a firsthand account of a Mission: SPACE experience that a Florida Today reporter had < here >.

Official Opening Day Is Today?

And, according to the Orlando Sentinel, Mission: SPACE's official opening day is today! < Read the complete story. >

Posted by: dizneluver9 on Aug. 16, 2003 9:54 am/pm

Hey Rich, Mickey and the rest of the Echo Gang,

I am planning on going into Epcot tomorrow and ride Mission:Space...I can't wait! :) I will post my review of the ride tommorrow night :D

We need a Mickey Space icon

:coolgrin:

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 16, 2003 1:17 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Kelly!

Thanks for going posting your Mission: SPACE experiences when you get back!

I agree, we need more Mission: SPACE stuff here, so how about these:


Avatars:
 

New MickEmoticon:
:space:

Posted by: garada3 on Aug. 16, 2003 4:12 am/pm

What is the height requirement for Mission Space?

Any idea how the parent swap will work with this ride?  I would really hate to go in the exit and miss all the great pre- show stuff!

Thanks!

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 16, 2003 6:45 am/pm

Mission: SPACE Fast Facts

Minimum guest height requirement: 44 inches

Location: Future World in Epcot (between GM Test Track and Wonders of Life pavilions)

Timeline: International Space Training Center, year 2036

Height of attraction: 35 feet

Area of attraction: 45,000 square feet

Queuing options: Standby line, singles line, and FASTPASS

Precautions: Guests prone to motion sickness or sensitive to tight spaces, loud noises, simulation or spinning can opt for the fun of the post-show Advance Training Lab

Planetary Plaza: Anchored with dramatic spheres representing the moon, Jupiter, a rotating Earth and the red planet. Quotations from significant persons adorn the area including, "Look Upward...from this world to the heavens," Plato; "The Universe...stands continually open to our gaze..." Galileo; and "We set sail on this new sea because there is knowledge to be gained..." U.S. President John F. Kennedy.

Space Simulation Lab: Anchored by a rotating Gravity Wheel. Also: a Lunar Rover on loan from the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

Gravity Wheel: 35 feet in diameter. Cutaway views of living areas in a habitat designed for space travel.

Ready Room: Crew positions -- pilot, commander, navigator, engineer. CapCom leading the training mission orientation is actor Gary Sinise.

Ride bays: 4 bays, each housing 10 X-2 rocket capsules

X-2 rocket capsule configuration: Straight-across seating for a crew of 4 guests

Total number of guests per each ride cycle: 160

Duration of ride: The entire Mission: SPACE experience, from pre-show to Advance Training Lab, can last from 45 minutes to more than an hour. The ride to Mars lasts approximately 4 minutes from capsule door close to open.

Ride system: State-of-the-art centrifuge technology, sophisticated visual imaging systems and audio systems. Two primary computers on the ride system control the entire ride and show functions of the attraction, including the pitch and roll of each spacecraft. In addition there are 30 motion-control computers on board that control altitude during flight. A show-control computer operates the interactive functions within each capsule.

G-Force: Of less force and less duration than an actual shuttle launch, and lower intensity than a typical roller coaster

Advance Training Lab: Post-show area includes Space Race, Space Base, Expedition: Mars, Postcards from Space

Mission: SPACE Cargo Bay: A 1,500-square-foot merchandise location includes astronaut-inspired gear

Presented by: HP (Hewlett Packard)

Copytright 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: RichKoster on Aug. 27, 2003 10:58 am/pm

If you think you might not be able to handle Mission: SPACE, where you sit makes a difference.

There are reports from Guests who have been on it many times that the intensity of the experience depends to a great deal on which seat you are in during the ride. The Navigator has the mildest ride, followed by a more intense ride for the Pilot, and then Commander. Those sitting in the Engineer seat feel the most g-force pull and spinning effects.

Posted by: Goofyteer on Aug. 27, 2003 8:06 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
Hey Rich, Mickey and the rest of the Echo Gang,

I am planning on going into Epcot tomorrow and ride Mission:Space...I can't wait! :) I will post my review of the ride tommorrow night :D

---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Far out! I can hardly wait! :coolgrin:
Posted by: joeandjenn on Sep. 09, 2003 9:22 am/pm

:space:  :clapping:  :space: Been there, done it, going back!  We rode it numerous times last week.  DH, Myself and DS7 loved it!  One person did get sick inside during one trip. :barf:  They quickly cleaned it up and no one knew the difference.  (DH saw the person with the gloves cleaning while he and DS7 were waiting to take off during the delay.)  CM said they had toned it down some.  It's still a blast!  It was DS7 favorite ride of all 4 parks!  Can't wait to go again!
Posted by: JEANYLASER on Sep. 09, 2003 8:24 am/pm

:bowdown: i love mission space i hope that you will love it.
Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 09, 2003 11:35 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
:bowdown: i love mission space i hope that you will love it.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Have you already taken a ride on Mission: SPACE, Jeany -- or do you mean you like what you've heard about it so far?

What's your favorite thing about it?
:space:

Posted by: GoofyOne on Sep. 12, 2003 2:22 am/pm

:clapping:
We went on Mission Space in August and it is GREAT!!!! This is the best ride ever, my 17 year old son could not get enough of it. However.... if you are prone to motion sickness I would NOT ride it. It does have incredible G force and spinning etc. If you do not get motion sick, it is a must!!!

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 12, 2003 9:16 am/pm

Hey Dizneluver9, did you post your review of Mission: Space yet? I can't find it. I'm anxious to hear what its like.

I see we have a new goof with us! I don't think I've said hello yet so let me say welcome to the Echo. You'll love it here :mickey:  :coolgrin:  :minnie:

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 12, 2003 9:28 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
I see we have a new goof with us! I don't think I've said hello yet so let me say welcome to the Echo. You'll love it here :mickey:  :coolgrin:  :minnie:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


Actually, GoofyOne joined us on June 09, 2003 and first posted her introduction in "Shake Hands" on June 17th.

I was wondering why you two Goofs hadn't noticed each other yet!
:D

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 13, 2003 1:26 am/pm

:blush:  :blush2:  :blush:
Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 14, 2003 4:03 am/pm

Mission:  Space

Coaster riders who eat up 360s and cork screws without ill effects and who never got enough of Star Tours and Body Wars will love this new attraction.  I am one of those; my wife is not.  I rode MS four times; she rode once and it caused her terrible nausea for over thirty minutes after its conclusion.  I thought we might have to leave the park after being there only 30 minutes from rope drop.  So the message here for this ride is KNOW THYSELF!  

Maybe you have seen those amusement park rides of various names where folks enter this big cylinder and must stand against the rubberized walls as the cylinder is made to spin until the rider is pushed against the wall so hard they stay in place even as the floor falls lower than the level of their feet.  Well, if you got sick on this type of ride, don't ride Mission Space...it is far more powerful a spin than those cylinders.  If Body Wars or Star Tours gives you nausea, don't ride Mission Space.  The ride is NOT for everyone.

Yes, have enjoyed all the seat positions, I agree that the Engineer has the greatest G force and spinning sensation.  I was Engineer on my first ride and it gave a sensation I had never in all my Cedar-Point-Magnum-coaster years felt.  When I ride the Tea Cups, I try to spin that thing as fast as I can make it spin so for me, Mission Space was a thrill and far more intense at lift off than anything I've ever encountered in a Tea Cup.  It was all I could do to keep my eyes open but I had this feeling that if I closed my eyes, I would fall apart.  The visual contact with the control view is needed to tell your brain that what the body is feeling is appropriate for what is being seen.  DON'T CLOSE YOUR EYES...you need them.

Next tip:  GO EARLY like right at rope drop.  99.9% of the guests at Epcot rope drop on 8/30/03 literally RAN to MS just like they do for Space Mt at the MK only worse.  Test Track did not seem to be pulling anyone away from Mission Space.  This is typical for a new ride, but MS commands as much pull on the crowds as the moon does ON the ride.

The good news:  even though on a holiday weekend with 99% of the rope drop guests heading toward the same attraction, the attraction handled it extremely well.  Standby line time did not exceed 10 minutes wait for the first 30 minutes of park opening.  It really helps to go to the single line anyway if you can.  This will give you a blast off much quicker.  So if you are in the rope drop marathon to MS, you will not have a long wait and will not need a Fast Pass even if you ride once and then get right back in line.  I was not around MS past 10AM to assess the wait times, but the bulk of the flow of people entering the park after the rope drop surge was flowing right to MS.  On the opposite side of Future World, there were no lines and no need for any FP in the Land and in Imagination until well past 11:30 AM

On 9/1/03 during our second day at Epcot, we arrived after rope drop, but before 10AM and encountered the same short wait time as on the 30th.  During the less busy, post Labor Day first week of Sept.,  I got in line for MS approx at 4PM and did not need a FP.  Standby was less than 15 min.  I got in the singles line and was allowed into the pre-show seating assignment area in less than 5 minutes.  The fast pass line, the singles line and the standby line all merge at this point.  Seat assignment access is awarded to FP people first if any are present, then Standby and the singles fill in the gaps if any open up.  I love parties of 3 and 5 whether FP or standby.
Eight people composing a crew of 4 for two spacecraft enter their respective spacecraft simultaneously.  

It is possible to exclude yourself from the mission with honor until you pull the bar down and the doors close.  Guests are alerted multiple times of the potential ill effects of the ride.  If you get sick from the spinning force, it's not going to be Disney's fault.

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 14, 2003 10:18 am/pm

Kirby, thank you so much for your very informative report. You given us details which I've never read anywhere else.
:clapping:

Uh-oh... there goes someone spinning by who didn't use your tips!
:barf:

Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 14, 2003 1:25 am/pm

Thanks Rich, glad to help.  
  Mission Space Litmus Test...guaranteed:
If readers are not sure whether or not they want to risk riding Mission:  Space.  My suggestion is to first visit the Magic Kingdom and ride the Tea Cups.  When the ride begins, start pulling hard as you can on the table wheel until you are spinning as fast as your arms can pull.  If you lack the strength to do this, ask a hunk to join you and help pull the spin.  If after having enjoyed a full power spin on this ride without feeling sick to your stomach, then you are qualified to ride Mission:  Space.  If you walk away and intensely feel like "hurling" your last meal or actually do so.  Please do your fellow guests and MS cast members a BIG favor and stay OFF Mission:  space.  

Now any normal person is going to feel some effects after being centrifuged.  I could barely walk after my first mission.  My stomach was quiet "unsettled" but it was not the same as the intense nausea that my wife experienced for so long.  Each person's reaction is likely to be unique.  I could not recall being so ataxic except after the first time I rode on a coaster with a cork-screw combined with and quickly following a 360 loop.  I suppose another good test would be the Rockin Roller Coaster which after initial acceleration does a 360 followed immediately by a cork screw, but RRC continues on a few more moments before guests are required to walk anywhere.  

Mission Space may soon have an emergency MANUAL control toggle switch for activation of the Emergency Space Barf Bag.  It could come in handy just about the time of the lunar "slingshot".  (Whew I survived, blast off.  I hope I can make it to the end of the mission...OH NO here comes the MOON.) beep beep beep "NOW ACTIVATING EMERGENCY SPACE BARF BAG for the Engineer and drop down nose clamps for all other crew members."  Happy Landings!

I love this ride.  I would go to Epcot next time and just spend my time in space if I could. :hearts:

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 14, 2003 3:21 am/pm

kirby428, thanks for the information. It's really informative and all. There's just some things I still don't understand:

When you say "Coaster riders who eat up 360s and cork screws without ill effects and who never got enough of Star Tours and Body Wars will love this new attraction" this is kind of confusing for me. I can't get enough of Star Tours and Body Wars but I hate coasters and especially anything that puts me upside down or corkscrews. Do you mean to say MS just spins very very rapidly or does it go into corkscrews and 360s too? I've spun teacups as fas as they can go and that's fine, but anything that's at all like a coaster scares me to death. That's why I'm having a bit of a tough time gauging.

I personally think Star Tours and Body Wars are "whoa isn't this just like the real thing" wonder rides and coasters in all forms are "scare the living daylights out of ya" rides. Which would you consider MS?

Or maybe when Rich rides it he'll tell me when he returns. I think you said Rich that you didn't care for coasters either somewhere on here?
:hurt:

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 14, 2003 4:40 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Chris & Kirby!

Yes, while I've never gotten "urpy" while riding a roller coaster, I personally don't want to ride the metal throw-you-around-and-loop-upside-down type roller coaster. I have enjoyed Rock 'n Roller Coaster -- but what might help with that ride is that you can't really see what's coming up ahead like you can in an outdoor coaster in the sunlight.

I'm guessing that the same applies to Mission: SPACE. And Kirby, you recommend keeping your eyes open and on the video presentation while the ride is going on, which also probably works to keep your mind off of the spinning that's going on, much like not seeing the loop-the-loop makes me willing to ride Rock 'n Roller Coaster for me while I won't ride other upside-down spin coasters.

Kirby, you wrote:


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Mission Space may soon have an emergency MANUAL control toggle switch for activation of the Emergency Space Barf Bag.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------

I'm sure you say this in jest. :) But what about barf bags? Do they hand you one before you enter the ride? That reminds me of horror movies of the 50s and 60s! Or are you just on your own inside the ride capsule, alone that is with 3 others... Unfortunate others if someone gets urpy.
:barf:

There's an idea... I'll take the airline sickness bag that will be available for me on the plane ride over to WDW and keep it for possible use at Mission: SPACE!
:idea:
If I do get urpy, I'm sure the CM's will appreciate having less of a mess to hose down. Now, there's a job I really don't want to have.
:grimace:

I'll be sure to give y'all a full report about how I felt after riding Mission: SPACE -- hopefullly while I'm still at Epcot. I'll be arriving on Thursday, October 2nd early in the morning and after checking in at the Polynesian my plan is to hop the TTC monorail to Epcot and get in line for Mission: SPACE first thing. I want to check out the ride before Carol and Michael arrive at the Poly that evening, to better gauge how they'd do on it.

After that, I can go to Innoventions and send an email message about my ride experences to someone who is willing to be standing by their email box at mid-day on 10/2 and then repost my comments to the Disney Echo in this thread. Any voluntEARS?

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 14, 2003 4:43 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
My suggestion is to first visit the Magic Kingdom and ride the Tea Cups.  When the ride begins, start pulling hard as you can on the table wheel until you are spinning as fast as your arms can pull.  If you lack the strength to do this, ask a hunk to join you and help pull the spin.  If after having enjoyed a full power spin on this ride without feeling sick to your stomach, then you are qualified to ride Mission:  Space.  If you walk away and intensely feel like "hurling" your last meal or actually do so.  Please do your fellow guests and MS cast members a BIG favor and stay OFF Mission:  space.
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


But I've also read reports from people who say they can't "stomach" the teacups -- even at a less intense level than you're suggesting for the "test" -- who had no problems at all on Mission: SPACE because you don't actually see yourself twirling around on Mission: SPACE as you do on the teacups ride.
Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 14, 2003 7:18 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
After that, I can go to Innoventions and send an email message about my ride experences to someone who is willing to be standing by their email box at mid-day on 10/2 and then repost my comments to the Disney Echo in this thread. Any voluntEARS?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I'll do it if you like :mickey:
Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 14, 2003 7:38 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
I'll do it if you like :mickey:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


That's great, Chris! I'll send it to your hotmail address -- unless you want me to send it to another one instead.

After you get my message, post it here as a reply.

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 14, 2003 7:53 am/pm

You can send it to my hotmail address, no prob :mickey:
Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 14, 2003 11:59 am/pm

Wait a sec Rich, I think I misread your reply, did you mean post any alternative email address here as a reply? Or did you mean put my hotmail here as well so you can access it from WDW?

Either is fine :mickey:

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 15, 2003 1:17 am/pm



---------------------QUOTE BEGIN-------------------
Wait a sec Rich, I think I misread your reply, did you mean post any alternative email address here as a reply? Or did you mean put my hotmail here as well so you can access it from WDW?

Either is fine :mickey:
---------------------QUOTE-------------------


I meant I made a note in my PassPorter of what the (hidden) email address of yours is in your profile -- the one at hotmail.com -- and I'll send you an email message from WDW about Mission: SPACE after I ride it. Once you get that email message, please post my mini-trip report here in this thread for me, since you voluntEARed.
:)

I'll be sending it to you as an email message to post here because I don't think there's any free access to websites at WDW (otherwise I'd post it to the Disney Echo myself live and direct from WDW) - - but if anyone knows of a place to do that without a charge, let me know 'cause I'm all ears!
8)

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 15, 2003 3:11 am/pm

No problem Rich. I just wasn't sure if you wanted the email address reproduced on here or not for your convenience, for a moment I was thinking you might have requested that for easy access from a public terminal :mickey:

But don't worry, I did indeed volunteer to share your stuff. It will be fun for me to help! :mickey:

Will you be sending along to me any photos to share with the text too?

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 15, 2003 3:34 am/pm

Probably the best I'll be able to do will be a video postcard from Mission: SPACE (silent).
Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 15, 2003 2:23 am/pm

Whatever happens we'll work something out, I just want to be prepared :mickey:
Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 15, 2003 9:10 am/pm

Mission:  Space is a unique experience.  Star Tours and Body Wars are flight simulators.  They jerk and tip and give the sensation of floating.  The sensation of floating is a part of Mission Space.  Once the spacecraft leaves the gravity of earth, one feels as if they would float away if not harnessed into their seat.  This, of course, is an illusion, but it felt to me rather real.  Most of us have never experienced true weightlessness, but in my estimation the ride does a good job of giving one the impression the ride intends.

The pre-boarding warning include any sensitivity to (flight) simulators as well as spinning rides.  This is why I included the two Disney simulator rides in the alert.  

I did not see any provisions for helping sick crew members about to barf.  True I had a tongue in cheek about the "emergency space barf bag" toggle switch, but only half way so.  I really think they should have such a thing...seriously.  

The visual impact of the spin experienced on tea cups make it different than the paradox of feeling the G force of a fast spin but seeing only linear motion on the video monitor.  One get thrown back into the seat by RRC at take off, but this can not be maintained as long and as hard as needed to simulate a blastoff into space, thus the need for the centrifuge.  The spin is smooth and silent and nothing clues your eye into recognition of a circular movement...unless you close your eyes.  So I suggest eye stay open just as the pre-show suggests or rather admonishes.  The ride really does require visual contact at all times to fully stay with the mission.  There is just that initial few seconds during blastoff where the G force is most intense that made me want to squint or do SOMETHING to cope with that feeling of being pressed backward into the seat so hard for what seems longer than it really is, but whose going to be watching a stop watch at THAT time.

When a roller coaster makes a complete 360 loop, there is some G force there, ditto with corkscrews.  Both of these can disturb the inner ear and cause people to get sick, some faster and more severe than others.  Some people must stay off playground swings.  Some folks can sail in high seas without problems; others turn green with gentle sea swells while others yet get sick just by thinking about the movement of boats and ships.

Remember, no other ride is IDENTICAL to Mission Space, but all those other Disney rides I listed have the potential to mess with the inner ear are given as models to help new crew members decide if they want the kind of experience that the ride offers.   If you took some of the motion characteristics of Test Track, Rocking Roller Coaster, TZTOT (because for a split second one feels as if they floated off their bench), Tea Cups, Body Wars and Star Tours and dumped them into a blender, the new creation would be something like Mission:  Space.

Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 15, 2003 9:31 am/pm

Goofyteer,

Guests can not see what the ride is doing to them on the outside of the spacecraft, but during the pre-boarding show they do show a computer graphic of how the crew compartments are oriented in a big circle and dangle from massive steel spokes.  I seriously doubt the ride inverts the crew on the mission like a coaster ride.  RRC was mentioned just because it also generates G force when the coaster loops in a tight radius.  I suppose Big Thunder Mt with its horizontal loops might have been a better example.  There is indeed a difference between a vertical inversion loop and a horizontal speed loop.  I am not surprised that some can not take body inversions but can tolerate horizontal spin.  It all depends on your inner ear and the way the brain responds to its input.  If you can spin fast on Tea Cups eyes open or closed, I would thumbs up riding MS.  I really have no IDEA why one is made to feel weightless on MS.  Maybe someone else can provide this insight.  

Readers should know that there are many sensations felt on MS and not just at blastoff.  The landing on Mars involves less spin and more flight simulator effects as the crew joysticks the craft to the landing zone much like Star Tours  but I never felt I was upside down.  On Star Tours, your a passenger; on MS you have a joystick...you feel in control...or NOT.  Happy Landings!

Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 15, 2003 9:44 am/pm

Rich you said


---------------------QUOTE-------------------
But I've also read reports from people who say they can't "stomach" the teacups -- even at a less intense level than you're suggesting for the "test" -- who had no problems at all on Mission: SPACE because you don't actually see yourself twirling around on Mission: SPACE as you do on the teacups ride
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



This comes as no surprise.  We are not all the same, but I still think the tea cup spin strong enough is the closest thing.  Remember, the Tea Cups travel along a track toward and away from the center as the cup itself rotates at a speed the rider regulates.  This changes the way the ride messes with the inner ear.  However, our brain and our stomachs have a great deal to do with our response to motion rides.  That is why the vision thing has an impact too.  I can remember riding a variety of spinners and what I would always do to help me tolerate the sick feel of the spin was to gaze on something that was not moving in a blur across my eyes...like my foot or the floor.  It can help sometimes which is why I say that keeping eye contact on the linear, straight ahead visual input of the blastoff or on the flight path can help offset the feel of the spin whenever G force is applied.

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 16, 2003 12:50 am/pm

Thanks for your help kirby428. It's assuring hearing your saying that you didn't think it did inverted spins, as it sounds like you've had a lot of experience with rides that do and can detect such things. If it just spins while the screen gives the impression of flying or something I'm sure I'll be just fine. Thanks for all your help! :mickey:

Now let's just hope that when I can ride it that no one else along on the ride with me will get sick. Because if they do watching them get sick will definitely make me upchuck!

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 16, 2003 1:39 am/pm

Which were the categories (pilot, navigator, etc.)/seating positions with the least intense to the most intense ride experiences again?

And do you get a chance to over-rule which category you are placed into, or should you just request the easiest category/seat position (whichever one that is) the first time you ride if you want to see if you can "stomach" it at the ride's mildest level?

Posted by: dizneluver9 on Sep. 16, 2003 8:43 am/pm

ok..here it is :) sorry it took soo long to post this but its my review of MISSION SPACE!!!!! :D

I have been on it twice and absolutely loved it both times :) I did feel alot of pull on my face each time...though it was in different parts of my face based on where I sat in the capsule.  

I didnt feel sick on the ride itself but when I was done with the ride both times I had a "rock" in my stomach....a large sprite and a good meal solved the problems both times.

My only complant is that the ride itself is way too short!!! :D  but worth the wait just to get the thrill of take off :)

There ya go :)

TTFN

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 19, 2003 12:50 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

disneyn has just passed along two video postcards from Mission: SPACE!


< Click here to see the first one >

...and < click here to see the second one. >

They'll only be viewable for the next 90 days.

Mission: SPACE Postcards From Space requires the latest version of the QuickTime plug-in. If you do not have QuickTime, simply click < here > (or copy this ENTIRE link and paste it into your Web browser) to download it:

< http://disney.go.com/help/software_center/index.html#quicktime >

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 21, 2003 3:53 am/pm

I wonder if Mickey and Goofy are sporting helmets. If they are then Mickey's must be huge! His head might look like something akin to a snowglobe or something with those ears.

Are they only going to be there for a limited time? I hope they'll at least be there a year or so while Mission Spce is still considered new for guests to check out. I'll have to see if I can make it out to WDW as soon as I can, it will be amusing to see if Mickey and Goofy are walking around looking like they're straight out of Moonraker :laugh:

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 21, 2003 4:35 am/pm


Oh, I think Mickey can handle it.




:space:



---------------------QUOTE-------------------
Are they only going to be there for a limited time?
---------------------QUOTE-------------------



Sorry, I don't know. The limited amount of time Eeyore had was a surprise to him... The CMs who work with him didn't know until he was reassigned back to the Magic Kingdom.

:oops:

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 23, 2003 11:05 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

A new attraction is now open in the Mission: SPACE post-show area. It is an online version of the Space Race game.

Posted by: RichKoster on Sep. 23, 2003 11:16 am/pm

Be the first to post a review of this new post-show attractions!
:idea:

Posted by: WDWfreak on Sep. 23, 2003 1:14 am/pm

Wow, there is some excellent info here on Mission Space.  Kirby428, great detail.  I too am a big Cedar Point fan.  Grew up going every summer and now go about every other year to take my son (most of my family is still in Ohio).

Looks like I'll have to skip MS which really bums me out.  I have vertigo and cannot tolerate constant spinning.  I seem to be the opposite of others.  I love roller coasters, upside down and every way and they don't bother me sickness wise, but cannot stand Space Mountain or Rockin Roller Coaster.  For me, as long as I can see what's ahead I have no problem, but the not being able to see what's ahead or about to happen really makes me sick.  

Now there are three rides I can't do at WDW! :unhappy:

Posted by: kirby428 on Sep. 26, 2003 6:10 am/pm

Lori,

Just curious:  are you able to tolerate the spin on the Magic Kingdom's TeaCups?   Can you tolerate Star Tours or Body Wars?  Mission Space also includes some flight simulator effects that feel different than the spin that simulates the G forces, but unlike being just a passenger on Star Tours, you are made to feel the role of pilot very much involved in the mission.  When the mind is involved in controlling the craft in flight, it offsets the motion of the flight a bit.  

If you decide to ride knowing you are vulnerable to spin, grit the teeth and bare the "LIFT OFF", then enjoy the rest as you do your job as a crew member pushing the buttons and helping with the joystick.  You may not need one, but take along a barf bag just in case and don't eat before boarding.  It is always best to be prepared.

My wife was a brave soul this past visit when she agreed to sample Mission Space.  Last time she was at Cedar Point with me, we both rode the Mantis coaster which is one of those (similar to Batman at Six Flags America Chicago) where the feet dangle in mid air as you twist and loop at "ludicrous speed".  She could barely walk down the exit ramp.  I didn't twist her arm to ride Mission Space; she was as curious about it as I was.  Now I wish I had gone aboard one time before she did.  I felt really guilty about her post ride nausea knowing her history of poor ride tolerance.   The more one knows in advance, the better one can decide whether or not to give it a try.

If your spin tolerace is increased by being in visual contact, Mission Space has a visual aid that does not clue you into the fact that you are in a spin.  That is why it really helps to keep the eyes on the monitor at all times.  

This might help too.  My first ride was the most intense and unpleasant.  After the first time aboard, I was braced and ready for the sensation and could enjoy it much more.  The 3rd and 4th ride was even better when I returned to the park a day or two later because I was actually looking forward to the G force sensation.  It is much like hot peppers I suppose.
The first time makes you want to die, then you actually crave the little rascals.

Posted by: JEANYLASER on Sep. 26, 2003 7:22 am/pm

:bowdown: i love the ride because it is very awsome in the disney world.
Posted by: WDWfreak on Sep. 27, 2003 12:28 am/pm

Sadly, no I can't do the teacups either.  I guess there are 4 things at WDW I don't do!  Even if I choose not to turn the tea cup, the ride itself still turns constantly.  My problem started when I was 15 and a bunch of friends convinced me to go on the Gravitron (the flying saucer looking thing at most fairs and carnivals) that seems like it spins about 100 miles per hour.   :barf:  I couldn't even move for about an hour after getting off the ride and then had to go home.  Even though Space Mountain and Rockin Roller Coaster make me queasy, at least on those as soon as I get off and get a drink I feel better.  With anything that is constant spinning, it doesn't seem to matter if I have something to stare at or not..I still get very queasy.

We arrive at WDW this coming Friday and are going straight to EPCOT after checking in at WL.  My 8 year old son wants to go on MS badly, so I'm thinking about taking one of my vertigo pills (heavy duty motion sickness pill) about an hour before hand.  Either way, I will definately go through the gueue.  The question is, will I go for it or take the chicken exit at the last minute?  I'm sorry to hear that your wife had a hard time with it.  

Mantis at CP is a great ride and doesn't bother me at all.  Again, typical coasters don't bother me at all because the loops are not constant spinning and I can see what's coming up.  

I hate to not try MS, but I don't want it to ruin the rest of my day at WDW either.  I guess I'll just have to see how gutsy I'm feeling when we're there!  Thanks for all the great detail, Kirby!

Posted by: Goofyteer on Sep. 27, 2003 4:38 am/pm

Maybe you might be able to try MS at the end of the day after you've done everything else you want to do? That way if it makes you ill you can at least head back to rest up for the night and not have to worry about it messing up the rest of the day for you. :idea:
Posted by: WDWfreak on Sep. 27, 2003 5:13 am/pm

That's a great idea, but unfortunately won't work for me this time because of our schedule.  Here's a little "pre trip report".

Leaving around 9:00 am Friday because my son has to be in school long enough for the teacher to take attandence (he doesn't want to mess up his perfect attendance for the 1st 9 weeks).  We'll be in WDW by 10:15 and check in at WL.  Then we are heading to EPCOT.  Have to leave EPCOT by 3:45 to head to MGM.  We want to catch Stars and Motorcars Parade at 4:30.  Then we'll ride a couple of things and then we have PS at Hollywood & Vine (Fantasmic Package) at 5:40.  After dinner do a couple more attractions then watch Fantasmic.  Head back to hotel in time to catch the Electric Water Parade.
Call it a night.  

Saturday we are going to Animal Kingdom and have a late lunch at Rainforest Cafe.  Head back to hotel in the afternoon to go swimming and relax.  That night we are going to Ft. Wilderness to do the hayride and campfire movie.  

Sunday we are going to go to MK first thing in the morning until about 11:00, go back to hotel for a swim and lunch.  Then we are either going to head to DisneyQuest (we have annual passes) or go play miniture golf.  After that back to the hotel for a nap before heading off to MNSSHP.  We have a 6:50 PS at Liberty Tree Tavern, was looking for earlier but they were all booked up.  

Monday morning (no school in Tampa, don't know about Orlando) we will check out and then do whatever park my son wants to do before heading home.  We'll be going back for another long weekend in December so if I don't do MS this time, maybe I'll try it then.

Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 05, 2003 10:20 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

Here's my Mission: SPACE video postcard to all of you:

Greetings from the ISTC Communications Center at Mission: SPACE, a thrilling new adventure opening at Walt Disney World's Epcot in 2003. We would like to confirm that Rich has transmitted a video Postcard from Space created especially for you.

To view your Postcard from Space, simply click here!


Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 09, 2003 8:11 am/pm

New Disney space ride so real it's sickening

Quick quote:
Walt Disney World's newest attraction, which opened on Thursday, cost $100 million to build and delivers a remarkable simulation of a rocket launch and spacecraft landing, right down to the nausea and brief moment of weightlessness.

< Full details. >

Posted by: MKBaughan on Oct. 10, 2003 10:56 am/pm

Hi everyone!  There was a huge two page ad in USA Today this morning about the opening of Mission Space...  It showed a space shuttle blasting through newspaper columns on Mission Space.  Pretty neat... then, a page later there is a full page ad about Disney and HP and a contest that they are sponsoring for 10 trips to WDW on New Year's Eve to ride the ride.... Just wanted to pass that along....
Marsha :space:  :pixiedust:

Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 10, 2003 7:29 am/pm

Thanks for letting us know! I'm moving this into the WDW message area and merging it into the comments about Mission: SPACE.
:)
Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 10, 2003 8:31 am/pm



Disney's new attraction Mission: Space is seen before its opening at Disney Epcot Center in Lake Buena Vista, Florida, October 9, 2003. The Planetary Plaza features spheres symbolizing Earth, Jupiter and the moon before embarking on Mission: Space. The attraction uses a custom design ride system based on NASA astronaut training.



Present and former Astronauts dedicate the new Mission: Space patch (upper right) at Epcot yesterday.



Some 17 present and former Astronauts, dressed in black, join with exceptional students from Oak Ridge High School from Orange county to dedicate the new Mission: Space patch

(Charles W Luzier/Reuters)

Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 12, 2003 3:59 am/pm



READY FOR THE MISSION


Excited guests respond to instructions from CapCom in order to successfully complete the mission to Mars while experiencing Mission: SPACE, the thrilling new attraction at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Inside the capsule, four guests become a team of astronauts working together to fulfill the mission. During this awesome adventure, which gives guests the sensation of blasting off into space, everyone in the capsule participates in completing the mission by using joysticks and buttons — all while viewing outer space through their own video screen. Mission: SPACE is presented by HP.

NAVIGATING ON MARS


With the help of a joystick and jump button, guests help astronauts navigate their way on the surface of Mars, avoiding windstorms and other hurdles in a race against time when they play Expedition: Mars. This simulated Mars adventure extends the fun of Mission: SPACE.

RACING THROUGH SPACE


Guests become members of Mission Control and use quick thinking when they engage in Mission: SPACE Race, a high-energy interactive game that explores the teamwork needed between Mission Control and astronauts in space. Two teams work against one another to fix problems on their ship and be the first to arrive at the race destination. This Mission: SPACE post show extends the adventure of the newest WDW's "E-ticket" attraction, Mission: SPACE.

SPACE ADVENTURE


Space Base, one of four activities in the Mission: SPACE post show, gives budding astronauts an opportunity to climb, jump and explore in a space-themed play area.

ROLLICKING RIDE TO MARS


Thrill-seeking Walt Disney World guests can chart a course for Mars and the stars in the new cosmic adventure Mission: SPACE at Epcot.

READY FOR THE MISSION


Four guests become a team of astronauts working together to fulfill a mission when they step into a capsule and prepare for takeoff at Mission: SPACE.

SPACE CAPSULE CREW QUARTERS


During the thrilling ride, which gives guests the sensation of blasting off into space, everyone in the capsule participates in completing the mission by using joysticks and buttons — all while viewing outer space through their own video screen.

RACING THROUGH SPACE


Guests become members of the Mission Control team when they engage in Mission: SPACE Race, a high-energy interactive game that explores the teamwork needed between Mission Control and astronauts in space. Two teams work against one another to fix problems on their ship and be the first to arrive at the race destination.

GOING WHERE NO THEME PARK ATTRACTION HAS GONE


Mission: SPACE at Walt Disney World Resort takes guests on a pulse-racing journey among the stars to Mars.

Copyright © 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: LilMarcieMouse on Oct. 14, 2003 12:08 am/pm

Mission Space's game Space Race can now be played online. During Park hours you with and Agenst floks at Mission Space.
< http://disneyworld.disney.go.com/waltdis....meindex >

This game is cool, and lots of fun. Enjoy. :mickey:

Posted by: Goofyteer on Oct. 17, 2003 6:28 am/pm

WOW! That was fantastic! Thanks a million Rich! Man I'm psyched to see it now for sure!
Posted by: Goofyteer on Oct. 17, 2003 6:36 am/pm

Far out! Thanks a bunch LilMarcieMouse! :)
Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 19, 2003 7:48 am/pm

TIGER'S FURTHEST SHOT


Tiger Woods, surrounded by participants from the Coca-Cola/Tiger Woods Foundation Junior Golf Clinic, prepares to blast off on Mission: Space -- the latest thrill ride at Walt Disney World Resort in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. Woods visited Epcot following a golf clinic and exhibition at Disney's Palm and Magnolia golf courses. Pictured L/R Eric Kirksey Jr. (age 12, Moon Township, Pa.), Elliot Bogan (age 7, Columbia, Mo.), Tiger Woods and Deanna Drake (age 13, Locke, NY). (Photo by Todd Anderson / Walt Disney World)

Copyright © 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY.

Posted by: Disneywacko on Oct. 20, 2003 3:27 am/pm

This may be a repeat question, but can you choose which role you want to be or is it assigned to you?  I would like to be a navigator or a pilot my first time on the ride so there is less chance of feeling sick.     :uhoh:
Posted by: RichKoster on Oct. 20, 2003 3:32 am/pm

When you walk into the curved hallway before entering your ride module, you'll step onto a marked area on the floor, one for each person. The spotlight will go on over each marked area as the narrator indicates what position that person will have. At this point, as long as the other 3 people don't mind, you should be able to switch "jobs" if you desire before entering the "space capsule."

After you are in the capsule, it is too small to switch seats then -- so work all that out before you start walking to the capsule.

Posted by: RichKoster on Nov. 17, 2003 10:20 am/pm

Yoo Hoo, Disney EchoEars!

I'm reposting part of my October 2, 2003 trip report here -- the part that is my review of Mission: SPACE.

I was walking past the big temporary stage set up in front of Mission: SPACE for the media event that week, on my way to meet Bruce "Rufus" Metcalf and his wife Marta.

I looked around at the impressive entrance plaza of Epcot’s newest attraction, but there was no sign of them yet. I walked to the FastPass area where we were to meet, but they weren’t there.

It was 11:55 am and the ride was a walk-on but I decided to get a FastPass anyway as a souvenEAR. You can’t beat the price!

It said I could return between 12:39 and 1:39 pm and that I could get another FastPass at 11:57 am – two minutes later!

I made note of the wait times listed on the electronic signs near there – Standby line: 5 minutes, Singles: 5 minutes.

I’m very impressed with this high-quality attraction. The theming is very well done, from the overall architectural design to the details in decorating and “plussing” Mission: SPACE.



The entrance plaza immediately sets the tone of this attraction, with its soaring lines and large moon and planets. Many facts and quotes about previous space missions are found here – not just the U.S. ones but all the Russian ones, too.

The FastPass machines are well arranged. You reach them after passing warning signs and a video about the attraction displayed on a flat-panel screen. Perhaps those who opt not to ride won’t waste a FastPass and won’t take one after seeing the video if they decide not to ride Mission: SPACE after all.

Although it was a walk-on when I was there, I can imagine the FastPasses all being given out early in the day like they are for Test Track.

While continuing to wait for Bruce & Marta, I examined all the information in the entrance plaza. It all adds up to a high quality presentation and introduction to the attraction. The overall layout of the entrance plaza works well: A Cast Member welcomes you and makes it clear that you are to go to your left to enter, except if you are using a FastPass, in which case you enter to your right. You won’t miss any of the theming if you are going to get a FastPass because to pick one up you also enter to your left to get your pass and see the same presentation as those entering to ride the attraction, and then you leave the FastPass distribution area going out its own exit back to the front of the plaza before you enter the rest of the attraction. When it is time to use your FastPass, you head to your right as you’re entering the plaza and once you enter the attraction you’ll see all of the themed areas that standby riders see (but without the waiting line). I’m impressed at how very well thought out and orderly everything is at Mission: SPACE.

After walking past the large model of the moon and planets in the entry plaza you approach an introduction area. There are signs over the entry way showing the wait times for Standby, FastPass lines, as well as what FastPasses are active at that time. From here if you keep walking straight ahead you come to the covered introduction area and beyond that are the FastPass machines arranged in a row from your left to your right. In the introduction area you’ll see warning signs about the attraction, a large flat screen monitor, and another CM who can answer any questions you may have about the attraction. He told me when I asked about whether the ride had been toned down or not that the ride was not toned down. If you turn left instead of going straight for the FastPass machines, you’ll enter the ride’s fully-enclosed pre-show area (heated and/or air-conditioned, depending on the weather).

When Bruce and Marta arrived, we greeted each other warmly and then Marta headed to the post-show area where we’d join her later after Bruce and I rode the attraction. It would be the first ride for both Bruce and me.

In the first pre-show room there was no need to walk through the snaking queue area since on that day it was a walk-on. The CM’s had wisely enabled the Guests to be able to walk straight towards the ride rather than zig-zagging through the empty queue area. As we passed by the spinning cross-section of a space station, Bruce pointed out to me the logo from Horizons which was put there as a tribute to the attraction which previously occupied this location in Future World. From the online reviews of Mission: SPACE that I had read, I got the impression the space station would be spinning much faster. I can’t see how the snail’s-crawl rotation speed it has would make anyone watching it sick. Bruce and I walked slowly to be able to see all the details. We joked about “Mr. Johnson” moving up in the world when we saw the Mission Control area, which reminded me of the similar control room which used to be at the Magic Kingdom’s “Flight to the Moon” and “Mission to Mars” attractions. In fact, there is a video monitor which occasionally displays an “Intruder Alert” of a bird landing in the flight area which was also used in those older attractions.

In the next pre-show room we lined up on the floor markers which divided us into 4-member crews, although because attendance was light that day we actually had only 3 people in our crew instead of 4. Everyone in all of the crew lines saw another introduction video on more flat-screen displays and then one crew group at a time were brought into the next area: a circular-curved hallway with many entrances to the various pods of the ride. We found more floor markers to stand on in there, based on the crew number we were assigned in the previous room. This time when another video played there were spotlights which illuminated each of us individually as we were told what crew member job each of us was assigned to.



I was navigator and would be firing rockets at the proper time. The door opened to let us get to our spacecraft and we each took our assigned seats. No one was sitting on my left, so the computer would handle that position automatically. Bruce sat to the right of me and another Guest we didn’t know sat on Bruce’s right. I had enough time and just enough room to stow my PassPorter, hat, camcorder bag, and Pal Mickey in the storage area in front of me and then close it. A CM checked to make sure we all had our seatbelts fastened and then closed the capsule. When that happened the control panel came closer to us, but I didn’t feel claustrophobic at all.

There was a large vertical “window” (flat screen monitor) in front of me and a joystick below it. To either side of the joystick were convenient areas to rest my hands. This control panel setup is duplicated in front of each of the four crew member seats.

Sometimes I kept my hands in my lap while waiting for when I was supposed to fire the button on the left, the button on the right, or control the joystick to help “steer” the craft when needed.  Under my left thigh I had put the air sickness bag I got on the airplane, keeping it close by just in case I would need to use it.



At lift-off I didn’t feel any spinning or and I didn’t have a dizziness sensation, although the g-forces pushing me back into my seat were quite impressive during our “vertical takeoff” while we were lying on our backs.



Once in outer space I fired a rocket to release parts of our space vehicle and we passed by the Hubble telescope. Then were on our way to the moon as we traveled further away from earth. The sling-shot maneuver around the moon pulled me to the side, but it wasn’t jarring like a rollercoaster. The ride was quite smooth.

My stomach had butterflies in it, but that might have been caused by a few factors other than the ride itself: the stories I had seen from other Guests who had gotten sick, the newness and unknown qualities of the ride for me, and the feeling of anticipation mixed with anxiety from reading others’ trip reports. I never got to a point where I felt like I was going to be urpy and have to use my air sickness bag and I also didn’t feel dizzy at all. When the ride was over Bruce and I told each other we were feeling fine. After exiting the space capsule I used a nearby bench to get my possessions in place on me (hat on head, camera bag over my shoulder with Pal Mickey clipped to its strap, PassPorter in hand) but neither one of us needed to sit down or drink from the nearby water fountain.

I’d like to ride Mission: SPACE again to see if the anxiety I felt would still be there or not on my second ride. If I feel fine on my second ride then I’ll know what I was feeling the first time was basically the fear of the unknown combined with anxiety after reading reviews of the ride from other people who happened to get sick on it.

Bruce and I met Marta in the post-show area and told her how the ride had been for us. Bruce thought she’d be able to handle it. I’m not sure if my DW Carol and DS Michael would be up to it or not, but I’d recommend to them that if they want to try it then they should. After all, I still have an empty air sickness bag they can use!



We didn’t try any of the games in the post-show area because they were all in use and we didn’t feel like waiting. One of the Expedition Mars surface explorer games was broken, with the animation on its display screen moving way too fast. Marta and I agreed that just looking at that could make people feel sick.

I did wait in a line (with only one person in front of me) to send the video postcard from Mission: SPACE which is here.



One of the 4 computer kiosks for the video postcards was broken.

Marta and I chatted about our disappointment in not seeing more educational information in the post-show area. There weren’t any of the facts and quizzes I had seen in Innoventions back in June when I was in the Mission: SPACE preview center. I don’t mind the games and I like the video postcards, but I think the post-show area should be bigger with more space activities and learning opportunities included in it.

Mission: SPACE is by no means a substitute for the Kennedy Space Center. People should still take a day off from WDW to see Nasa if they are on a week-long vacation. In my opinion, seeing Disney’s Animal Kingdom is a worthy substitute for going over to Tampa to see Busch Gardens, but Mission: SPACE – although a great attraction and certainly an E-Ticket, cannot be compared to the experience of being at the Kennedy Space Center. Do both if you can schedule a day trip outside Walt Disney World!

After seeing enough of the Mission: SPACE post-show area and the gift shop (which is also nicely-themed and has some easy to find Hidden Mickeys), we walked towards what used to be called the Communicore, and along the way we examined the temporary stage that was set up for that week’s media event. Temporary short-height ramps had been placed at Mission: SPACE’s exit and the walkway nearby in order to be able to have power cords and audio/video cables go to the stage.

All images Copyright 2003, THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY

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